ARCHIVE

Posts Tagged ‘Importance of Education’

11: Talking Forensics with Audio & Video Forensic Expert Allen Combs

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

11: Talking Forensics with Audio & Video Forensic Expert Allen CombsAllen Combs is an Audio and Video Forensic Expert with over ten years of experience in multimedia work.  He began working as an audio engineer in recording studios and continued working in music production until making the transition into digital media forensics.  When he began his forensic work, Allen was trained by Thomas Owen and in 2010 started his own company, Combs Forensic Services.  Since then, he has worked for numerous clients, including both law enforcement and private citizens, and has gained experience testifying in many of his cases.  Allen is an active member of the American College of Forensic Examiners, the American Board of Recorded Evidence and the Audio Engineering Society.  In addition to these organizations, he is also putting together an audio forensic training course with Dorothy Stout, owner of Resolution Video.

Allen Combs bases his company on integrity, professional expertise and dedication to their clientele.  If you would like to contact Allen or Combs Forensic Services, they can be reached through combsforensics.com or allen@combsforensics.com.

Now listen in as Ed Primeau and Allen Combs discuss the drastically changing market of Audio Engineering, the importance of continuing education in the digital media forensic field, and the challenges that individuals must face when taking on a career as a forensic expert.

6: Continuing Education as a Forensic Expert

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

6: Continuing Education as a Forensic ExpertAs a forensic expert, continuing your education in your field of expertise is extremely important in remaining a credible forensic expert.  I practice audio and video forensic work and at the rate that technology is evolving, it’s important for me to stay up to date on all of the latest advancements in the field. This is not exclusive to digital media forensics.  New developments are made in all areas of expertise.  Being an expert witness requires you to have current and accurate knowledge in your field of expertise.

When an expert witness is first called to the stand in a courtroom, their client lawyer will begin with the direct examination.  During this, the lawyer will ask questions that establish the expert witness’s qualifications and credentials.  After the direct examination, the opposing prosecutor or attorney will question the witness and challenge them as an expert witness.  The more experience and credentials you have in your field, the harder it becomes for the opposing attorney to disqualify you as an expert witness. Certifications and diplomas are documented proof of your relevance and credibility as an expert in your field.

Get involved in organizations related to your field.

I am a member of the American College of Forensic Examiners Institute and am on the advisory board of Recorded Evidence.  We help determine the qualifications for Audio Forensic Experts and are currently updating the test to become certified.  It is extremely important be forward thinking when managing your career as a forensic expert.  Its not enough to be status quo when you are a forensic expert. You have to have the most accurate and up to date knowledge and be able to apply that knowledge to remain a credible forensic expert.

Now listen in with Audio and Video Forensic Expert Ed Primeau as he discusses the importance of continuing your education in your field as a forensic expert.

Video Forensic Expert – The Importance of Continuing Education

Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Video Forensic Expert - The Importance of Continuing EducationI have been practicing as a video forensic expert for 30 years. I have experienced and observed hundreds of hours, if not days, of security video. I have performed video forensic testing on analogue and digital security systems. I have even forensically examined cell and smart phone video, tablet video and VHS, Hi8 and 8mm, digital 8mm, digital and analogue beta and even ¾” video (which by the way plays from right to left unlike any other analogue video format). I write this introduction not to impress you, but rather express to you that I have been around the block a few times.

However, this week I experienced something new. I took a continuing education class in ‘Digital Video Processing Techniques’ taught by Dorothy Stout of Resolution Video Inc.

On the first day, we were asked to introduce ourselves and say what we expected to learn from the class. When it was my turn, I introduced myself and said ‘I don’t know what I don’t know. That is why I am here, to learn what I don’t know.’

Any forensic expert who thinks they know everything about their expertise is arrogant, especially in video forensics where technology is constantly changing. Dorothy took our class through three days of very interesting lectures about digital video processing techniques, software training and actual security video hands on assignments. Her demeanor and teaching style in the front of the class made these three days very invigorating. Learning was fun and easy thanks to Dorothy’s experience. She is sought out by government agencies, law enforcement and private practice video forensic experts like myself all over the country for video forensic training.

I learned about software programs, work flow, case management and most importantly, had my confidence boosted because I had already known quite a bit about the various video forensic processes that we covered and practiced.

Anyone with a passion for video forensics should consider taking one of Dorothy’s video forensic classes. I learned a lot and enjoyed the experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download Edward Primeau’s C/V

Video

 Check out our other Forensic Services Websites: